Jump to content
Pro Wrestling Only

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'JWP'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Pro Wrestling
    • Pro Wrestling
    • The Microscope
    • Publications and Podcasts
    • Greatest Wrestler Ever
    • Armchair Booking
    • Newsletter recaps
    • Village Green Preservation Society
    • Pro Wrestling Mostly
  • PWO Database Plus
    • The Matches
    • Shows & Full Releases
    • Wrestlers & Other Personalities
    • The Rivalries
    • The Companies
    • The Towns
    • The Championships
    • Interviews & Promos
    • The Merchandise
    • The Media
    • The Exploratory
    • The Years
    • The Days
  • DVDVR Project Backup Forum
    • 1980s Lucha
    • 1980s Puerto Rico
    • 1980s Portland
  • New Millenium Blues
    • NMB Wrestling Archive
  • Administrative
    • Site Feedback
    • Forums Feedback
    • PWOFSD
  • Who Booked This?'s Show Discussions

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Apparel
    • T-Shirts
    • Jackets and Sweatshirts
    • Hats
    • Masks
    • Other
  • Video
    • DVD
    • VHS
    • Beta
    • Laserdisc
    • Other
  • Books
  • Magazines
  • Newsletters
    • Wrestling Observer Newsletter
    • Pro Wrestling Torch
    • Other
  • Toys
    • Action Figures
    • Other
  • Trading Cards
  • Video Games
  • Board Games
  • Music
  • Posters
  • Photos
  • Wrestling Gear
  • Ticket stubs
  • Programs

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Skype


Twitter


Instagram


Location

Found 96 results

  1. Itsuki Yamazaki awesome match train continues. Much like the Kansai match this was an extremely effective singles match crafted around the personality of her opponent. Plum is of course completely different from Kansai. I dug the opening of this match a lot, as Plum immediately dumps Yamazaki with a huge german suplex. Yamazaki makes a brief skillful comeback, but immediately rolls outside to sell her neck. Next thing that happens is Plum working over that neck with elbow. The match was full of cool little touches like that to add purpose to even basic moves: Yamazaki controls with some sleeper holds early on, Plum complaining about being choked, so when Plum makes her comeback she almost puts away Yamazaki with a sleeper of her own. When Plum was catching Yamazaki with her rolling legbars, the first thing Yamazaki does after she regains control is drop Plum with a big kneebreaker before stumbling across the ring selling her own leg. I thought the story of the young girl pushing the superstar to the edge of defeat was done in really compelling fashion and Yamazaki's fast moving spots were cool. Also, this was a rare match where the spot where a wrestler gets pushed off the tope rope while the other is trying for a flying move actually ended up being of importance. Really well worked high end joshi match for 1990, Yamazaki is 2-0 so far.
  2. The other fun part of watching the original JWP: getting to check out how good Mayumi Ozaki was early on. She was a 5 foot 90 pound girl with 3 years of experience, but the way she wrestled here, she might aswell have been Arn Anderson. She brought the asskicking to the idol girl in a way that made this resemble a US style match, working Cuty over with stomps to the face, big knee drops, stepping on her hand etc. I know this type of stuff is bread and butter joshi, but I still thought the way they paced the match early on was exceptional, with Ozaki dominating and Suzuki having to string a few nifty babyface flyer spots together to regain control. Eventually Suzuki starts working a chickenwing crossface (everyone in JWP uses the UWF submissions), before Ozaki lands a cool leg trip to stomp the hell out of Cutie's leg – which is promptly no sold cause Cutie ain't no Mimi Hagiwara, but okay. They do 50/50 section trading a bunch of nearfalls and keeping a good „this could be decided at a coin toss“ feeling before Mayumi seals it by catching Suzuki flying at her into a bridge suplex that was pretty cool. Oz was queensized in this match, and even though they both made their debut the same year, it felt like a seasoned vet carrying a young flyer to an impressive match.
  3. This is an amazing match; not just by far the best JWP match I've seen probably ever, but in the top 5-10 of the finest women's single matches I can remember. What made this outstanding was that what they did was stylistically state of the art, mixing 80s NJPW-like shootstyle/wrestling hybrid with something resembling a classic title match, and emotionally captivating: right from the get go there is a ton of disdain, uncooperativeness, and another fantastic underdog performance from Harley. So this is like a joshi version of Fujinami/Maeda, without the blood and more outright hatred. Kandori is naturally really good at grabbing flash submissions and they use their holds really well, while Harley was bringing the violence with her kicks – there are a few moments where she is contorting her body to get out of Kandori's holds and then proceeds to kick Kandori in the face and ear repeatedly. It was awe inspiring. Kandori gives her back some raining angry shots down on her smaller opponent too, and with some of the uncooperative moves, stiff shots and flash subs here I was thinking I was watching some sort of Tenryu/Hashimoto/Fujiwara showdown. Another cool thing is how they interweave their shootstyle stuff with more traditional wrestling, they were working shoot kicks and flash armbars one minute, and then neck bridges and small packages. The rollups make really good nearfalls because JWP was booking a lot of rollup finishes, and thanks to that they can build to big section of 2,99999s for the ending run that doesn't have that big move spam. Some incredibly well timed spots, and there is one false finish that is executed in a way I can't recall seeing in many other wrestling matches, which sets up another angry Kandori comeback to the keep the crowd behind Harley. I mean, watching what they did here felt like the stuff that is missing from so many wrestling matches, they had the folks at Korakuen hall flipping out for a small package or fall-on-top counter. Really great match that delivered beyond expectations, considering this is Kandori years before coming into Superstardom and Saito who was almost completely under the radar (RIP, you magnificient gem). Mindblowing that you can still find shit as good as this in 2017 that has apparently never been talked about.
  4. This is the finals of the UWA title tournament. In a way this feels like an early Misawa/Kawada match, two young workers having a somewhat basic match upgraded to epic format, while adding their own touches. This is different from the get go, as they start slow on the mat and really work to establish their roles. I don't know whether to call this a match that is extremely unlike joshi, or extremely JWP. There certainly is something really cool about the style they are working, as they mix bridge spots and sunset flips with the brutally stiff shots Kansai is known for (and Harley steps up to her level). The pace was almost like a niggly european bout, as they would stick to wrestling, but occasionally there would be an explosion. Kansai starts the fun, but whiffs on a dropkick and Saito pounces on her with a series of kicks and knees in the corner that would've done Kawada proud. Of course this does not end well for little Harley and soon after Kansai is cracking her with kicks and chairshots. This sets up the rest of the match for Harley refusing to quit despite being in a grueling battle. I could see some people not being overly in love with the generic title match layout for this match (there's even rollup exchanges at one point), but I thought Harley was a phenomenal underdog here and the style they used was awesome. Great match, Harley really should've been a bigger star.
  5. Hahaha, I just noticed Kansai comes out to Conga. „My themesong is goofy latin pop, now watch me brutalize girls with my unpulled kicks.“ This was shockingly good for a Sawai match – it starts fun with Kansai taking one of the hardest guardrail bumps I've ever seen (scaring the audience in that section good) before Sawai works a fun control segment, using chokes and a spinning body scissor. They get into stiff slapfights and trading headbutts on the ground and this is pretty cool big girl wrestling. Kansai takes over with her badass kick to the throat and then methodically works over Sawai's back with headbutts and brutal kicks to set up her Scorpion Deathlock. However Sawai makes another comeback, this time bloodying Kansai by ramming her head into the steel ringsteps. Kansai is selling big and making desperate comebacks now and Eagle continues to work the cut with punches. Sawai impresses me by selling a good deal herself, acknowledging the work on her back from earlier. They do these spots where one girl goes for a suplex and other twists in mid-air to crush her with her weight, which look double cool because these two are chunky. I felt the match was building to a bigger crescendo than we got, but then again this was only the semi final. Still, quite good match for what it was, and I could see this being considered a classic if it happened in a US fed.
  6. I'm not sure why the name change from Miss A to Dynamite Kansai. She looks and wrestles the exact same. This was a first round match in a tournament for the UWA International title(?) and a better match than a lot of tournament finals I've seen. Why have I never heard anyone talk about how awesome Itsuki Yamazaki was in JWP? It's far more interesting than anything I've seen her do in AJW. Right at the go Kansai whacks Yamazaki with a big lariat, but in the following tussle on the outside Yamazaki catches her leg and rams it into the steel post. Yamazaki proceeds to work over Kansai's leg and use this advantage to stay in control. When Kansai comes back, she immediately reestablishes how dangerous she is by crushing the veteran with ultra stiff blows. I thought Kansai's selling was good enough, as she made it clear the leg was bothering her and there were times where she couldn't follow through due to the damage done, on the other hand Yamazaki was super focussed and always aiming for the weak spot to get out of her situation. Yamazaki would add these cool maestra-like touches, such as locking in an octopus hold from her back, or elevating herself extra high when reversing a figure 4 (something I've never seen before). Yamazaki had excellent game, but in the end fell to a crushing shot from Kansai when she thought she had her in the bag. Really good skill vs. Pure brutality match.
  7. Jetlag

    Carlos Amano

    Female worker that doesn't get talked about enough. Great unique moveset with the combo of headbutt variations and shootstyle submissions including the awesome Imada triangle choke. What matches do I need to see? Anything from her run that is considered a "highlight"? Seems like she was midcarder for life while occasionally playing tag partner for Chigusa and other old timerettes. I've really enjoyed her vs. Hyuga, Yoshida, Mizunami, Kana, Ran Yu Yu, AKINO, Chikayo Nagashima, and her vs. Aja Kong is on my to watch list. Also apparently she teamed with Hiromi Yagi was Masked Angel Freia which is total dream matchup. Apparently, only two of her singles matches vs. Meiko Satomura made tape, and one was clipped down to about 2 minutes, the other was in 1999. What a travesty. Any fans of her around here? Maybe an opinion from someone who was watching in realtime?
  8. This was a really good studio match between two talented young workers. Hell knows why, but for some reason they got a lot things right that many other joshi matches get wrong. It may be just my imagination. The thing I liked most about this bout was that it was basically a primitive approximation of a lucha title match. They start it very mat based and build nicely from simple holds into submission nearfalls. Then Bolshoi Kid was working like one of the stranger luchadores - think Matematico, or maybe Super Astro, doing all these funny clown moves that work really well for an eccentric technical wrestler. Mariko shows her colors when it's time to drop bombs and she dishes out some big suplexes with a lot of snap. Really good sequences where Mariko gains the upperhand and lands a series of big dives, but gets caught with a piledriver on the floor. Mariko actually sells the floor piledriver a good deal allowing Bolshoi to get some nearfalls over her at this point much more established opponent. Quality match, proof Bolshoi could really go and Mariko too.
  9. This was a pretty fun match between two young and eager workers. The Scorpion works a fun junior/shootstylist hybrid style and Ozaki always adds a ton of personality to her matches. In fact Ozaki looked as good and charismatic as she did in her most famous matches. Her outfit was pure pulp awesomeness and she reminded me a little bit of Negro Casas here in how fast she was thinking and how she would exploit weaknesses relentlessly. Scorpion's execution was a little sloppy at times, so I have no problem calling this an Ozaki carryjob. Whenever Ozaki was able to grab an arm or leg, she would stomp the shit out of that body part to create an opening, then go for the finish. Because this was 1990, moves like a superplex or sunset flip were HOT nearfalls and they timed everything extremely well, resulting in a bunch of 2,9999s that the crowd went bananas for. Weak finish, but I still liked the match a lot.
  10. The original JWP is painfully underexplored. This is probably it's most prolific match, and it's more interesting than a great match. You may theorize that this is Kandori, the dangerous shooter putting the pro wrestler under fire and setting the blueprints for Kandori/Hokuto... which is a good formula, but in reality it was Devil dragging a green Kandori by the nose through a long match. Kandori looks good on the mat, and not very good doing anything else. Devil is as mean as you can want a hardened veteran to be carrying this and brings the goods, downing Kandori with a huge punch, almost ripping her in half with a surfboard, dishing out clubbing blows to make up for Kandori's weak kicks and so on. The biggest problem with the match is that it's needlessly long, as the iconic moment - where they both start bleeding all over the ring - only comes about 30 minutes into the match, and before that, there's a lot of meandering. It felt a bit like Devil redoing the Chigusa match against a far lesser Chigusa with nice submissions. The actual bloodbath was kind of underwhelming too, honestly. There's always charm to watching a rookie and a veteran going along for a lengthy match and this had enough good moments and nearfalls to keep you satisfied, but I gotta say this wasn't as good as I've seen it hyped up. Also, I'll never understand what was up with that restart/overtime they did.
  11. JWP's hotness goes against the megastar. These two highly athletic wrestlers with a number of spectacular moves in their pocket could easily go braindead and do suplexes and 2.99999s all the time, but instead we get a STORY~! with Yagi trying to take down the much higher ranked vet using her submission game. Toyota was really vicious, stomping on Yagi's head to break submissions, crushing her with extra vicious dropkicks and at one point just booting her off the top rope. "I don't give a fuck about you" Toyota is way better than workrate supergirl Toyota. Because Yagi is tiny you get the sense Toyota was really manhandling her. Match had a good pace, they start out taking turns bumping eachother really hard into the guardrails before slowing it down with some matwork and then actually building to the big suplexes and spots. Yagi didn't do anything out the extraordinary here, as almost all her offense was flash submissions as usual, but her bumping was pretty great as she'd just spike herself into the mat to put over the beating Toyota was giving her.
  12. Great little match that takes place in a tiny little hall in front what looks like 40 people, filmed with one cam. You know a match is gonna be good when it starts it with them ramming their heads into eachother. Amano had some nice explosive moves early on including a great deadlift back suplex before they slowed the match down with grinding matwork. I thought the JWP ace Hyuga being able to control in parts before Amano slowly got the better of her using her grappling skill was really well done, as Amano has these crazy twisting flash submissions making the moments where she catches Hyuga extra off-guard. Also, Hyuga came into the match with a bandaged knee that was an obvious target for Amano. All the stuff of Hyuga evading Amano's leg attacks was really good, and once Amano closed the distance her legwork was pretty great too. At one point she just rammed into Hyuga's knee with a running boot, and her double stomp right to the joint drew an audible reaction from me. Hyuga aside from one brief fuckup did very well here as her fastness and slickness is entertaining to watch, she did an admirable job selling her knee too altough she Supergirls it a little right before the finish. Really cool match that stayed in the ring and never went into overkill while going well over 20 minutes.
  13. Another forgotten match that is actually some damn good story driven pro wrestling. Well, it may not have enough wrestling for some people's taste, but I give them credit for selling their butts off. The early going was really nice joshi style work: unpredictable exchanges where they didn't do anything stupid, and there was a good amount of struggle. Then, an overconfident Hyuga got caught and crushed by Fukuoka's brutal double stomp finisher. This transitions into second half which is mostly built around Hyuga's pretty epic selling. Fukuoka follows up by working over her stomach area with nasty stiff toe kicks and knees. Pretty brutal and awesome stuff, and we get these almost Hogan/Andre like spots of Hyuga trying to body slam lift Fukuoka into position for her Michinoku Driver II. All the MDII spots where pretty great and the second half of the match felt like classic puro stuff built around simple moves, both wrestlers gutting it out and struggling for control. Really good stuff and another hidden gem.
  14. Talk about it here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJl8Ug3j09E
  15. JWP Openweight Championship: Hanako Nakamori © vs. Tsubasa Kuragaki This is the final JWP Openweight Championship match on the final JWP show ever, so of course it ends on a roll-up. This was actually going well until that puzzling finish, they were beating the shit out of each other, head-drops and head-kicks, Tsubasa being the chunky powerhouse-high flyer hybrid that she is, the kind of stuff you want to see on a final show, but that finish could not have been more anticlimactic. A company's finale should have a decisive finish. Maybe Tsubasa didn't want to do the clean job. Strange booking, in any case. ***1/4
  16. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VcT7KCLKXAU This is Nakamori's first defense of the JWP title that she won at the end of last year. They did a terrific job laying this match out with a veteran like Leon posing enough of a threat to the new champ but not being a clear favourite. It made you actually buy into how close and competitive the match was. The finish is long but that due in a way to the both of them selling the big moves that each of them were hitting on each other. The only thing that keeps this from being a great match is the work isn't as smooth as it should have been. Still, this is a strong, well earned, first defense for Nakamori. ***3/4
×