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JerryvonKramer

Letters from Kayfabe

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This is a brand new show that is going to come out every Thursday on PWO-PTBN. Shows will never be much longer than 1 hour. I'll post all the shows in this thread.

 

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Episode 1:

 

http://placetobenation.com/letters-from-kayfabe-1/

 

lettersfromkayfabemain.jpg

 

Join Allan and Parv as they explore the deepest recesses of the WWF universe, "the edges of the cheese platter".

 

On this first show:

 

1. The Mailbag: Shane Douglas in 1990-1 / Buddy Rose: the blow-away years / Nick Bockwinkel in the WWF

 

2. The Event Center with JT Rozzero: The 1991 King of the Ring Tournament

 

3. The Long Topic: King of the Ring tournament pre-93 / The "King" title

 

To write in to the mailbag, tweet @allan_cheapshot or @JerryvonK

 

Follow along on YouTube:

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I think you may need a color guy to breathe some more life into the show. You guys seem to have a very mellow tone which lends itself to looking back with a retrospective analytical air but it may not fit with the feeling I would get looking back at wacky WWF hi jinks. I don't know how one can carefully scrutinize Buddy Rose in WWF without embracing the absurdity and I don't know that you hit that mark.

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I really dug this show guys!

 

I remember Bobby Heenan had an ongoing thing going in the Magazine where he said Shane Douglas looked like Kim Basinger. I always thought that was funny. I was surprised to see Douglas worked some Superstars matches, I though he was one of those kind-of name-guys that only worked Prime Times, mostly losing

 

I'd like to hear you guys go into detail about those types of guys. The guys who weren't true jobbers but they were never going to get an action figure and rarely, if ever worked the syndicated shows. I'm talking about the Jim Powers, Scott Casey's, Al Perez's, Tim Horner's and Chris Walker's of the world. They moved away from this around the time Raw launched but there used to be that grey area between jobber and superstar.

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I think you may need a color guy to breathe some more life into the show. You guys seem to have a very mellow tone which lends itself to looking back with a retrospective analytical air but it may not fit with the feeling I would get looking back at wacky WWF hi jinks. I don't know how one can carefully scrutinize Buddy Rose in WWF without embracing the absurdity and I don't know that you hit that mark.

 

First show, there's always going to be room for improvement. Thanks for taking the time to give us both feedback, I hope you give us another chance with Episode #2.

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I really dug this show guys!

 

I remember Bobby Heenan had an ongoing thing going in the Magazine where he said Shane Douglas looked like Kim Basinger. I always thought that was funny. I was surprised to see Douglas worked some Superstars matches, I though he was one of those kind-of name-guys that only worked Prime Times, mostly losing

 

I'd like to hear you guys go into detail about those types of guys. The guys who weren't true jobbers but they were never going to get an action figure and rarely, if ever worked the syndicated shows. I'm talking about the Jim Powers, Scott Casey's, Al Perez's, Tim Horner's and Chris Walker's of the world. They moved away from this around the time Raw launched but there used to be that grey area between jobber and superstar.

 

Thank you for listening Chief, and for taking the time to let us know! Much appreciated!

 

I didn't know that re: Heenan saying Douglas looked like Basinger. I always thought Heenan made that reference regarding Perfect, as he has that line on the 1990-11-27 PrimeTime show.

We're going to be hopefully looking at guys like Scott Casey and Al Perez et al. in future shows. You know you're more than welcome to write in a question if you wish.

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Screenshot_from_2016_09_10_20_56_37.png

 

A friend of the show.

Amazing.. I just assumed Parv took the only two Canadians he knew (Kelly Nelson & Steven Graham) and combined their names....

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The Hulkster War Helmet was used simply for the reason that Bad News Brown would refuse to job to Hogan. Hogan has talked about it in interviews. It wasn't used because Hogan thought it was cool. Hogan would get DQ'd for hitting Brown.

Not sure if it was used against piper.

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Episode 2:

 

http://placetobenation.com/letters-from-kayfabe-2/

 

MRiel2R.jpg

 

Allan and Parv step close to the very edges of “the cheese platter” as they go deeper into the world of WWF.

 

1. The Mailbag: Hogan Fist Helmet / brown-hair Dino Bravo in late 91-early 92 / Ian Mooney

2. The Event Center with JT Rozzero: Jointly promoted WWF and WAR card from September 15, 92

3. The Long Topic: The changing look of the WWF from 1983 to 1993

 

To write in to the mailbag, tweet @allan_cheapshot or @JerryvonK

 

Follow along on YouTube:

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The Hulkster War Helmet was used simply for the reason that Bad News Brown would refuse to job to Hogan. Hogan has talked about it in interviews. It wasn't used because Hogan thought it was cool. Hogan would get DQ'd for hitting Brown.

Not sure if it was used against piper.

 

Listen to Episode #2 as there's more to it than that.

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I particularly enjoyed the segment discussing the changing look of the WWF over the years. One thing you didn't mention was the standardisation of the ring itself. In the mid 80s they seemed to have older rings which popped up now and again, even on big televised events. If you watch Wrestling Classic from 85, it's a much bouncier ring than usual with rubber tubing ropes (rather than real ropes). The turnbuckles were also taped up rather than having proper pads. At WrestleMania 2, the following year, on one of the rings, the ropes were attached to the ringpost by chains rather than the normal turnbuckles. There were probably other examples of this too. By 88 as you said though, this never would happen. Everything was standardised with the official uniform WWF look. It's a very interesting topic.

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I'd love to hear some discussion about the use of music in WWF from 1985-93. At the beginning, having music made a wrestler stand out. By the end of that period, anyone without music seemed really weird.

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I particularly enjoyed the segment discussing the changing look of the WWF over the years. One thing you didn't mention was the standardisation of the ring itself. In the mid 80s they seemed to have older rings which popped up now and again, even on big televised events. If you watch Wrestling Classic from 85, it's a much bouncier ring than usual with rubber tubing ropes (rather than real ropes). The turnbuckles were also taped up rather than having proper pads. At WrestleMania 2, the following year, on one of the rings, the ropes were attached to the ringpost by chains rather than the normal turnbuckles. There were probably other examples of this too. By 88 as you said though, this never would happen. Everything was standardised with the official uniform WWF look. It's a very interesting topic.

One thing I know on this is that on the Mid-West shows in traditional AWA country, they'd use Jerry Valiant's ring, and as part of the deal Valiant would get a spot on the card. This is why Jerry Valiant is still around as a jobber in 1985. Some of you might recall him losing to Uncle Elmer in seconds on SNME.

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Something to add to the discussion about when WWF faded out the hogan type bar cage.

 

It's last appearance on TV/PPV as actually the Rebellion 2001 show in the UK. It was used in the Edge vs. Christian, cage match. I think this may be because they had this type of cage in storage in the UK and it was far less expensive than shipping over the mesh style one that had been used in the previous few years.

 

e689cc4e0.jpg

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Forgot to mention the black barred cage (replacing the blue one) debuted in February 99 for the Vince/Austin match.

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